2022 Hyundai Tucson First Look: One Look Isn’t Enough

2022 Hyundai Tucson First Look: One Look Isn’t Enough

Mark a new car first story as a ‘first look’, as we do here at MotorTrend, may prove to be slightly limiting on occasion. What if a new vehicle, say, the 2022 Hyundai Tucson, invites a second, third, or even seventh look? If you only have one look to give, however, we tell you to make it last as long as possible with Hyundai’s all-new compact crossover.

What’s up? Almost all

The current Tucson has been on sale since 2015, having been completely redesigned for the latest 2016 model year. It’s a competent, albeit modest, entry into the competitive compact crossover segment. (It puts the midpack in our class ranking.) The 2022 Hyundai Tucson, on the other hand, is almost entirely new, with fresh styling, new hybrid powertrain options, and a massively overhauled interior.

Hyundai will build two versions of the Tucson, one with a short wheelbase and one with a longer one – only the latter will be sold in the United States (This strategy is similar to the current VW Tiguan, which is sold in America in the longer its two overall shapes to provide more interior space.) As before, front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive will be available.

Hyundai Tucson 2022

Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022

Now watch a very long time

You’re not looking at a concept car or a design appearance, it’s the 2022 Hyundai Tucson you can buy next year. Wild, isn’t it? Packed into the fairly classic high hatchback form of a modern compact crossover SUV, it’s a lot of styling. Typically, this causes problems, as stacking design on top of design can often be too much. On the Tucson, however, the riot of bends, chamfers and heavy surfacing. We wouldn’t call the result beautiful, and some of the frills or maybe overly flowery on their own, but the Tucson is eye-catching without being ugly.

Hyundai is working here with a new styling language, which we haven’t seen on any other production model except the limited-production, high-tech Nexo fuel cell electric vehicle. The face of the SUV is striking and dominated by a combination of grille and extended wing headlights. Deep cheekbone vents with fog lights tucked inside are likely non-functional, but give the Tucson a more focused aesthetic than most small SUVs. Ditto the Hyundai’s athletic stance, where the wheels appear to sit off the body under bulging fenders and the tail appears to be lifted in the air. Casual!

However, the eyes of most observers turn quickly to the tail lights, the shape and execution of which is reminiscent of the layout of the Ford Mustang’s vertical bars. As we noted when preview images of the Tucson dropped before the official debut, however, the lights are more original than they appear at first glance. There are only two bars per side (the Mustang wears three), and they are connected by a full-width reflective unibrow. Each tail light bar is also more triangular and three-dimensional in shape than the units in the Ford pony car. Other innovative styling touches include the faux vents stamped into the trailing edge of each fender flare, the Hyundai badge hovering in the tailgate glass, and the silver trim (with its own simulated vent marking on its edge. trailing) which goes up and on the side window to the tail of the Tucson. Final dimensions have yet to be revealed, but it looks like the new Tucson is taller than the old one; this theory is supported by the cargo volume figure provided by Hyundai. At 38.7 cubic feet, the 2022 Tucson’s cargo area is significantly larger than the 2021 model’s 31 cubic foot cargo bay; both figures are measured with the rear seats upright. With them folded, the silhouette of the new Tucson surely jumps beyond the 62 cubic foot capacity of the current model.

Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022
Hyundai Tucson 2022

The interior hits hard

Forget the Tucson’s current interior styling if you haven’t already. The cabin of the new model transforms its premium views, with a handsome dual cockpit setup divided by a cascading center stack and an elegant “floating” center console. A trim element lining the top of each front door flows into the dashboard, with well-integrated air vents integrated into each front corner; this trim line continues all the way past the driver and front passenger and frames the center stack. A push-button transmission control package streamlines the already sleek center console by doing away with a traditional shifter; Right in front of the console is a set of physical buttons arranged horizontally for seat heaters and ventilation, steering wheel heaters, parking cameras and sensors. Control treatments scream “luxury car!” even though the Tucson is rated and sold as a mainstream compact SUV.

A new 8.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone integration is standard, but the optional setup is mind-boggling – it’s a 10.3-inch touchscreen that adjusts to the surrounding panel. . Underneath is a strip of backlit touch controls for volume and adjustment, as well as shortcuts to the navigation, radio, media, and setup menus. Although they are logically laid out, the controls raise two potential shortcomings: First, being touch sensitive and shapeless, the buttons will likely require a glance to function (you cannot easily “feel” a touch button. flush when you can a physical button or a knob). Also, speaking of buttons, there aren’t any on the 10.3-inch screen – just press the inputs for volume and adjustment, which could prove to be tedious, as is the the case in some products of other car manufacturers.

At least with the optional 10.3-inch display, the Tucson also includes touch-sensitive climate controls below the main touchscreen. These flank a conventional digital display of air temperature and fan speed. Again, the button layout looks intuitive, but these touch controls have the same potential drawbacks as those on the audio system. More information on the base setup, which we presume won’t be touch sensitive, is expected later this year, when US-specific Tucson 2022 information is released.

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One gasoline engine, two hybrid options

Big changes are in store under the Tucson’s curved hood. Last year’s engine lineup – a 2.0-liter four-cylinder and a 1.6-liter turbocharged engine – is being replaced by an all-new 2.5-liter four-cylinder and a pair of hybrid options based on a 1.6-liter turbocharged gasoline engine and an electric motor. The 2.5-liter four is standard and offers 190 horsepower and 182 lb-ft of torque (both figures are preliminary estimates). It is mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission, also new to the Tucson, and will also be offered with front and all-wheel drive choices.

Both hybrids include a classic gasoline setup and a plug-in hybrid with a large battery for electric-only driving capability, much like the Ford Escape Hybrid and Escape Plug-In Hybrid models. Whichever hybrid you choose, it will feature a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder (180 horsepower, 195 lb-ft of torque) assisted by an electric motor of indeterminate power and using a six automatic transmission. speeds. Hyundai cites total horsepower for the system, a substantial output of 230 horsepower and 258 lb-ft, on par with some turbocharged and non-hybrid competitors and reminiscent of Toyota’s strategy with its similarly sized RAV4 hybrids and plug-in hybrids, which are more powerful than their gas siblings and promise both better fuel economy and improved performance.

More zest may also be on the horizon: Hyundai isn’t offering details yet, but it has announced that a sporty N Line trim will be part of the Tucson’s 2022 lineup. The Elantra and Sonata N Line models provide a general plan, but beyond that, further details (including US specific information) regarding the new Tucson and its N Line variant are expected closer to the end. of the year.

The first look at the Hyundai Tucson after 2022: One glance is not enough appeared first on MotorTrend.

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